FEATURED ARTWORK

Three Black Artists Featured in Cadillac's Art of Daring. Do You Know Them?

Three Black Artists Featured in Cadillac's Art of Daring. Do You Know Them?

written by China McGee

Word travels fast when a brand gets it wrong. (Black Twitter won’t let us forget any epic brand fails like Pepsi and Nivea.) But when a brand does something to expand minds and uplift spirits, they too deserve recognition.

Enter Cadillac. In keeping with its long-standing relationship with African-Americans, the automotive brand recently spotlighted three accomplished Black artists who’ve mastered the art of daring--each on a courageous mission to bring their unique vision to the masses.

Know them. Support them. Add them to your timeline.


Maya Freelon Asante

A moment of serendipity opened the eyes of artist Maya Freelon Asante to a new medium and message that she never imagined before. This is The Art of Daring.

Talk about turning lemons into lemonade. When a water leak in her grandmother’s basement soaked through a pile of tissue paper, Asante saw the bleeding colors and abstract patterns as reminders of her ancestors’ strength and resourcefulness. Now, this award winning Baltimore native creates stunning tissue paper assemblages as a colorful way to incite joy. Follow her for endless mixed media reminders of Black people’s beauty and resilience.


Hebru Brantley

Self-taught artist Hebru Brantley has taken his craft from the streets of Chicago to galleries across the world. This is The Art of Daring.

Hebru Brantley is a product of his environment. Born and raised on the southside of Chicago, he has used his fandom of superheroes, anime, hip-hop, and street art to create his signature childlike characters. Each of his paintings and large-scale installations depicts an adventure that challenges cultural stereotypes in an easily digestible way. Follow the man and his lifestyle brand if you can’t get enough of relatable kids of color doing dope things.


Saya Woolfalk

The Japan born, New York based artist taps into both cultural influences to create her own multidimensional Afrofuturist world inhabited by a fictional race of women who can alter their genetic makeup and fuse with plants. She calls them Empathics. Their skins are covered in both feminine and natural elements like pearls and flowers. And their bodies seem supernatural with extra arms, spines, and heads. It is this melding of science fiction, fantasy, African textiles and Japanese anime that raises the question - could cultural hybridity open the door to utopian possibilities? Follow her to get your fill of fantastical feminism, intricate patterns, and earthy excellence.

Swizz Beatz: Hip Hop's Patron and Advocate for the Arts

Swizz Beatz: Hip Hop's Patron and Advocate for the Arts

 Spike Lee characters brought to you by a Brooklyn bodega

Spike Lee characters brought to you by a Brooklyn bodega